James

Eva

Insulation

Insulation

The easiest part of insulating our van was installing the batts of wool...

Eva and I took many a day deliberating the many choices for insulation. We were looking for a material that we would feel safe living with in a tight space, could handle variations in moisture, and would minimize our impact on the environment. In the end, we decided to insulate our van with sheep wool! We purchased seven rolls of 24" batting from eco-buildingproducts up in Michigan, and in the end only used six of the batts. Sheep wool insulation is many times more expensive than most conventional insulation methods, but we think it is well worth the cost.

Before installing the insulation, we had to remove some rust from the interior of the van walls, repaint some spots, and seal the inside of the van from the elements. Upon removing the fiberglass insulation that was in the van when we purchased it, we discovered that some of the old insulation had gotten wet, and subsequently had molded. It turns out that the dark gray plastic trim pieces that run along the length of the outside of the van are held onto the van with a series of plastic snaps. In some locations water had found its way through the holes for the snaps and had caused the water damage we discovered. After sanding, neutralizing, and painting the damaged metal, we filled the larger holes with expanding spray foam, and covered the smaller holes with silicone caulk.

We also had to finish the interior wall and ceiling panels before installing the insulation. It took more than a month before we were truly ready to put the insulation in the walls. Once ready, the insulation only took one day to install. The batts of wool are lightly held together with plastic netting, which tears easily by hand to make smaller pieces that easily stuff into the walls. We held the insulation in place with tape before putting up the panels.

Flooring

Flooring

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